Protect Your Groundwater Day
Sep
3
12:00 AM00:00

Protect Your Groundwater Day

Protect Your Groundwater Day

Save the date!

Protect Your Groundwater Day takes place on September 3.  PYGWD is an annual observance established to highlight the responsible development, management, and use of groundwater. The event is also a platform to encourage yearly water well testing and well maintenance.

In the weeks leading up to PYGWD, NGWA encourages everyone to become official “groundwater protectors” by taking steps to conserve and protect the resource. Businesses, individuals, educators, students, federal agencies, cities, associations, and everyone in between can ask to be added to our groundwater protector list through our website or on social media. Have a great story to tell? Great! Send it our way and we may highlight your efforts. 

August is also National Water Quality Month, providing an additional opportunity to get educated and spread the good word about protecting groundwater.

Facts

Approximately 132 million Americans rely on groundwater for drinking water. It is used for irrigation, livestock, manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power, and several additional purposes, making it one of the most widely used and valuable natural resources we have. Consider the following facts:

  • Americans use 79.6 billion gallons of groundwater each day.

  • Groundwater is 20 to 30 times larger than all U.S. lakes, streams, and rivers combined.

  • 44 percent of the U.S. population depends on groundwater for its drinking water supply.

  • More than 13.2 million households have their own well, representing 34 million people.


Check back often, as we will provide social media graphics, logos, and more ways you can help raise awareness.

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AWRA Water Bingo!
Jul
11
6:00 PM18:00

AWRA Water Bingo!

American Water Resources Association presents Bingo Night for students and young professionals.

AWRA invites you to a night of bingo and networking with complimentary career advice from water resource professionals. Appetizers will be provided. Bingo winners will receive a cash prize!

RSVP at the AWRA website HERE

Date and Time: July 11, 2019 at 6:00 pm
Location: Irish Snug, 1201 East Colfax Avenue #100, Denver CO 80218

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June 2019 Monthly Meeting
Jun
20
12:00 PM12:00

June 2019 Monthly Meeting

From June 20th to 21st 2019, Geotech will present the 11th Annual Geotech Field Days event. 2 days of equipment demos and hands-on training on a wide variety of Geotech state-of-the-industry instruments, plus food, drink, and comprehensive networking are all part of this prestigious event. And it's all FREE! You and your colleagues are invited to join us to learn more about our product lines and interact directly with manufacturers and esteemed national service providers.

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Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer
Jun
5
6:30 PM18:30

Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer

MODFLOW and More 2019: Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer.

FREE to the Public!

Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer: Dr. John Doherty, Watermark Numerical Computing

Ben H. Parker Student Center Grand Ballroom 6:30 to 7:30pm

“Modelling for Decision Support – Starting from the Problem and Working Backwards”

Many groundwater models are commissioned and built under the premise that real world systems can be accurately simulated on a computer - especially if the simulator has been “calibrated” against historical behavior of that system. This premise ignores the fact that natural processes are complex at every level, and that the properties of systems that host them are heterogeneous at every scale. Models are, in fact, defective simulators of natural processes. Furthermore, the information content of datasets against which they are calibrated is generally low.

The laws of uncertainty tell us that a model cannot tell us what will happen in the future. It can only tell us what will NOT happen in the future. The ability of a model to accomplish even this task is compromised by a myriad of imperfections that accompany all attempts to simulate natural systems, regardless of the superficial complexity with which a model is endowed. This does not preclude the use of groundwater models in decision-support. However it does require smarter use of models than that which prevails at the present time.

It is argued that, as an industry, we need to lift our game as far as decision-support modeling is concerned. We must learn to consider models as receptacles for environmental information rather than as simulators of environmental systems. At the same time, we must acknowledge the defective nature of models as simulators of natural processes, and refrain from deploying them in a way that assumes simulation integrity. We must foster the development of modelling strategies that encapsulate prediction-specific complexity supported by complexity-enabling simplicity. Lastly, modelers must be educated in the mathematics and practice of inversion, uncertainty analysis, data processing, management optimization, and other numerical methodologies so that they can design and implement modeling strategies that process environmental data in the service of optimal environmental management.

John Doherty, Ph.D., is the author of PEST, a software package that is widely used for groundwater model calibration and uncertainty analysis. He has worked for more than 35 years in the water industry, first as an exploration geophysicist and then as a modeler. Doherty been employed by both government and industry, and has also worked at numerous universities where he undertook research and supervised postgraduate students. Currently he works for his own company, Watermark Numerical Computing, doing consulting, research, programming, and education, mainly on issues related to model deployment in support of environmental management and impact assessment.

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Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer
Jun
2
7:00 PM19:00

Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer

MODFLOW and More 2019: Birdsall-Dreiss Distinguished Lecturer.

FREE to the Public!

Laura Crossey, University of New Mexico
Hydrochemistry and geoscience education at Grand Canyon and beyond: Who knew groundwater hydrology could be so complicated?
Ben H. Parker Student Center Grand Ballroom 7:00 to 8:00pm

Hydrochemistry and Geoscience Education at Grand Canyon and Beyond: Who Knew Groundwater Hydrology Could Be So Complicated? Springs and associated riparian environments provide critical habitats for both aquatic and terrestrial wildlife in the Grand Canyon region. Springs also provide drinking water for Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP). Grand Canyon springs are fed by world-class karst aquifer systems (both shallow and deep) on the Colorado Plateau, but increasing pressure on groundwater resources from climate change, mining and other development activities pose major challenges to resource managers. The shallow and deep karst systems of the region interact in ways that are revealed by recent studies. General hydrologic models for the Colorado Plateau aquifers highlight the importance of recharge areas (‘springsheds’) for water supply. Ongoing work by several groups is helping to understand these complex relationships using multiple tracer methods. A robust monitoring and geochemical sampling program can provide data for understanding the sustainability of spring-fed water supplies for anthropogenic use. Our ongoing geochemical studies of spring waters (including dissolved gases) have identified the importance of mantle-derived volatiles and CO2 that contribute dissolved salts and other products of water-rock interactions at depth to the regional aquifer systems. Faults are important conduits for fluid transport and mixing and hence impart a tectonic influence on water quality. The result is a multi-porosity system resulting from variable ages and mixing of meteoric recharge, karst system transport, matrix sandstone transport, fault connectivity, and endogenic inputs. Quantitative forecasting of the effects of climate change on water quality depends on our understanding of these deep inputs (diminishing surface flows affecting recharge rates), as well as aquifer recharge flowpaths and quantities. Results from Grand Canyon and other spring-supported stream systems in the western U.S. indicate the need for development of hydrologic baselines that recognize these complexities. This can be accomplished through use of both natural and artificial tracers to unravel mixing and environmental sensors to monitor real time changes. These investments are needed to inform water management decisions that address societal and ecosystem needs.

Laura J. Crossey is a professor in the Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico. She received her Bachelor’s degree in geology at Colorado College (1977) and Master’s degree at Washington University in St Louis (1979). Her master’s thesis was on the trace element geochemistry of basalts from the Rio Grande rift as part of the Terrestrial Basaltic Volcanism project in the 1970’s (advisor Dr. Larry Haskin). She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Wyoming (Laramie, Wyoming, USA) in 1985 on the Origin and Role of Organics During Burial Diagenesis under the direction of Dr. Ronald C. Surdam. She joined the faculty at UNM in 1986 (first woman tenured, first woman full professor, first woman Chair). Her research group explores applications of low-temperature geochemistry to problems in hydrochemistry, diagenesis, geomicrobiology, and geothermal processes. Her research approach combines field examination of modern environments (water, gas, geomicrobial materials and sediments) with laboratory analysis as well as core and outcrop study to evaluate paleohydrology, spring sustainability and reservoir/aquifer characteristics. Related activities include geoscience outreach, K-12 outreach, and science education research as well as programs to increase the participation of under-represented groups in science. She is a Co-I on the NSF-funded statewide New Mexico Alliance for Participation. Her research on carbonic springs has taken her to the Great Artesian basin of Australia, the Western Desert of Egypt, and the Tibetan Plateau Laura has served the hydrogeologic and broader geoscience communities on proposal and academic program review panels and volunteer boards. A list of her publications may be found on her public Google Scholar profile. She has been a member of GSA since 1997 and a Fellow since 2012. She was awarded Lifetime Membership to the New Mexico Geological Society on the basis of her service. She has served as President and past-President of the Sedimentary Geology Division, convened many topical sessions at GSA national meetings, and served as Technical Program Chair for the Rocky Mountain Division. She has served as Associate Editor for GSA Bulletin, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta and Applied Geochemistry, and was editor of SEPM Special Publications. She and her husband Karl Karlstrom were awarded an Outstanding Achievement Award by the American Institute of Professional Geologists in 2015 for designing and building the Trail of Time, a geoscience exhibition at the Grand Canyon (funded by the National Science Foundation, and recognized as Best Wayside Exhibit by the National Association for Interpretation in 2011). 

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Jun
2
to Jun 5

MODFLOW and More 2019: Groundwater Modeling and Beyond

MODFLOW and More 2019: Groundwater Modeling and Beyond

Number: 19SP1109A

Location:

Ben Parker Student Center, Golden, CO USA

Date(s): June 2, 2019 — June 5, 2019

Fee(s):

  • Regular IGWMC Member Attendee (through May 1, 2019) — $685.00 (USD)

  • Regular Nonmember Attendee (through May 1, 2019) — $650.00 (USD)

  • Student Attendee* (through May 1, 2019) — $325.00 (USD)

  • Regular IGWMC Member Attendee (after May 1, 2019) — $765.00 (USD)

  • Regular Nonmember Attendee (after May 1, 2019) — $730.00 (USD)

  • Student Attendee* (after May 1, 2019) — $365.00 (USD)
     

Visit "Fees and Options" section of this registration form for short course registration.

More or different fees may apply; see the "Fees and Options" section later in the registration process.

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Apr
21
8:00 AM08:00

Groundwater Week - Deadline for Submissions

Groundwater Week 2019 is designed to provide both educational and networking experiences for all who work in the groundwater industry. Every opportunity to maximize the foundations of groundwater science with water supply, resource protection, and remediation will be applied to this premier groundwater event. We learn best from each other and thus we invite you to share your research, technology transfer, unique applications, and experience in one of a variety of options in Las Vegas, Nevada, December 3-5.

The content is being designed to address both the most prevalent and niche groundwater topics. Given the location of the event, application to arid lands is especially encouraged.

All submissions are captured electronically and the content management system turns off at 11:59 p.m. ET on April 21, 2019.

All accepted presenters are subject to the Groundwater Week registration fee and must be registered 45 days prior to the event or their presentation will be withdrawn.

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National Groundwater Awareness Week
Mar
10
to Mar 16

National Groundwater Awareness Week

  • National Groundwater Association (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The following is information from NGWA https://www.ngwa.org

Theme

This year’s theme, Think, was designed to urge each of us to consider various ways we can protect our most valuable natural resource. So Think about not running the water while you brush your teeth. Or Think about getting that leaking faucet fixed. Think about the farmers that rely on groundwater to grow the food we eat. And Think about having your well inspected to protect your drinking water system. In short, during #GWAW, Think about our future.  

 Get Involved

In the weeks leading up to #GWAW, NGWA encourages everyone to become official “groundwater protectors” by taking steps to conserve and protect the resource. Businesses, individuals, educators, students, federal agencies, cities, associations, and everyone in between can ask to be added to NGWA’s groundwater protector list through its website or on social media. Have an awesome story to tell? Great! Send it to NGWA and they might highlight your efforts.

Facts

Approximately 132 million Americans rely on groundwater for drinking water. It is used for irrigation, livestock, manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power, and several additional purposes, making it one of the most widely used and valuable natural resources we have. Consider the following facts:

· Americans use 79.6 billion gallons of groundwater each day.

· Groundwater is 20 to 30 times larger than all U.S. lakes, streams, and rivers combined.

·   44 percent of the U.S. population depends on groundwater for its drinking water supply.

·   More than 13.2 million households have their own well, representing 34 million people.

Please visit www.ngwa.org/gwaw2019 for more!


National Ground Water Association
601 Dempsey Road
Westerville, Ohio 43081
USA
(800) 551-7379

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Protect Your Groundwater Day 2018 - NGWA
Sep
4
9:00 AM09:00

Protect Your Groundwater Day 2018 - NGWA

The following is information from NGWA https://www.ngwa.org

As August — which is National Water Quality Month — gets underway, NGWA wants to remind you of an upcoming important September “water” date as well. Protect Your Groundwater Day 2018(#PYGWD), taking place September 4, provides an opportunity for people to learn about the importance of groundwater and how the resource impacts lives.

Throughout August we’ll be sharing downloadable/shareable resources and information on #PYGWD.

NGWA recommends that water well owners have their wells checked and tested by a certified and/or licensed contractor every year to ensure water safety. Learn more at WellOwner.org.

Thanks for helping us spread the word about the important role groundwater plays in all of our lives!


National Ground Water Association
601 Dempsey Road
Westerville, Ohio 43081
USA
(800) 551-7379

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